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Canadian Junior A Hockey

HISTORY OF THE CANADIAN JUNIOR HOCKEY LEAGUE

In reality, the CJHL received its start in 1970 when the Ontario Major Junior Hockey League, Quebec Major Junior Hockey League and Western Canada Hockey League tore away from the major branches of the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association and became its own governing body (what would become the Canadian Hockey League). These "Major Junior" Leagues only competed against each other and did not include other Junior "A" leagues that were left behind. The Major Junior League also were permitted to exclusively compete for the Memorial Cup, a right given to all Junior "A" leagues prior to 1970.  In May 1970, Frank McKinnon tabled a motion at the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association AGM to allow the remaining Junior "A" Leagues to compete at a national level for a national championship.  The motion was granted and McKinnon and the Manitoba Amateur Hockey Association donated the Manitoba Centennial Trophy to the new championship in honour of 100 years of ice hockey in Manitoba.

 
 

 

 

Leagues

The leagues that would be involved in that first year were:

  • British Columbia Junior Hockey League (BCJHL)
  • Alberta Junior Hockey League (AJHL)
  • Saskatchewan Amateur Junior Hockey League (SAJHL)
  • Manitoba Junior Hockey League (MJHL)
  • Southern Ontario Junior A Hockey League (SOJHL)
  • Thunder Bay Junior A Hockey League (TBJHL)
  • Central Junior A Hockey League (CJHL)
  • Northern Ontario Junior Hockey Association (NOJHA)
  • Maritime Junior A Hockey League (MJAHL)
  • New Brunswick Junior Hockey League (NBJHL)

In 1971, the Newfoundland Amateur Hockey Association jumped on board by allowing their provincial Junior champion to compete in the Centennial Cup play-downs. This lasted until 1977. Also in 1971, the Maritime Junior A Hockey League folded, leaving the Charlottetown Islanders (the defending Dudley Hewitt Cup champions) to enter the Centennial Cup play-downs as an independent team.  Also in 1971, the Newfoundland Junior A Hockey League entered the fray. In 1972, the Northern Ontario Junior Hockey Association folded when two of its teams (Sudbury Wolves and Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds) jumped to Major Junior. The Charlottetown Islanders closed their doors after a marginal performance in the 1972 play-downs. Two new leagues opened in 1972, the Ontario Provincial Junior A Hockey League was created as a rival league to the Southern Ontario Junior A Hockey League. The SOJHL was more in Southwestern Ontario, while the OPJHL focused more on the Greater Toronto Area. The other new league was the Quebec Junior A Hockey League.  In 1973, the Island Junior Hockey League of Prince Edward Island made the jump from Junior B to Junior A. In 1975, the Eastern Junior A Hockey League ascended to Junior A from the Junior B ranks in Cape Breton Island. Then, in 1977, the Metro Valley Junior Hockey League jumped from Junior B to Junior A in mainland Nova Scotia. After one year of playing head-to-head for the provincial Junior A title, the EJHL folded and left the MVJHL as the only league in Nova Scotia. After various attempts to create a stable Junior A system in Newfoundland, the NAHA and its teams pulled out of National play in 1977. The Southern Ontario league folded in 1977, the Northern Ontario Junior Hockey League was promoted to Junior A in 1978 and the NorMan Junior Hockey League was promoted to Junior A in Manitoba in 1979. A second league was founded in British Columbia in 1974, the Pacific Coast Junior Hockey League was created to compete with the British Columbia Junior Hockey League - this league was absorbed by the BCJHL in 1979.

A year later, the Peace-Cariboo Junior Hockey League was promoted from Junior B in East-Central British Columbia. That same year, the Thunder Bay Junior A Hockey League folded. They were replaced by a single team, the Thunder Bay Kings later to be the two-time Centennial Cup champion Thunder Bay Flyers.  The summer of 1982 saw the folding of the Quebec Junior A League. In 1983, the New Brunswick Junior Hockey League folded and merged with the Metro Valley Junior Hockey League. In 1985, the NorMan Junior Hockey League faltered and folded. In 1987, the OPJHL, then known as the Ontario Junior Hockey League, folded after dropping to only four teams. During the 1988 Centennial Cup playoff run, the Black Lake Miners of Quebec were allowed to enter as an independent team. That summer, the Quebec Provincial Junior Hockey League was formed, rebranded the Quebec Junior AAA Hockey League in 1997.  In 1989, Newfoundland would take a second shot at Junior A with the promotion of the St. John's Junior Hockey League.

The league dropped back to Junior B in 1991. Also in 1991, the Island Junior Hockey League folded and merged with the Metro Valley league. The Metro Valley League now had all three Maritime Provinces incorporated in to it and decided to change its name to the Maritime Junior A Hockey League.  Out West in 1991, the Peace-Cariboo league expanded south into the Kootenays and rebranded itself as the Rocky Mountain Junior Hockey League. In 1993, Southern Ontario came back in a big way with two leagues—the Ontario Provincial Junior A Hockey League and the Metro Junior A Hockey League. By 1998, the two leagues would merge under the Ontario Provincial banner with 37 teams under its belt. In 1999, the Rocky Mountain Junior Hockey League folded.

In 2000, the Thunder Bay Flyers folded, having competed strictly in the United States Hockey League since the 1996-97 season. A year later, their void was filled by the Superior International Junior Hockey League. In 2008, the Ontario Provincial League rebranded itself to the Ontario Junior Hockey League, just to be divided into two leagues in 2009 (Central Canadian Hockey League and Ontario Junior A Hockey League), and be reunited in time for playoffs that year under the Ontario Junior Hockey League banner. In 2010, the Central Junior A Hockey League became the Central Canada Hockey League.

CANADIAN JUNIOR HOCKEY LEAGUE PHILOSOPHY

 

Philosophy

 

The Canadian Junior Hockey League is a national organization comprised of 10 Junior A hockey leagues in Canada.  The CJHL represents 131 teams and more than 2,900 players.  The CJHL operates under the auspices of the Hockey Canada Branch structure and is a member in good standing within Hockey Canada.  The CJHL is the only sanctioned Junior A Hockey League in Canada.  Each year players compete for the Royal Bank Cup National Junior A Championship.  CJHL players are also selected to represent Canada at the World Junior A Challenge as well as compete at the annual CJHL Prospects Game.  Currently, the CJHL has over 2,900 alumni furthering their hockey careers at the professional, college and major junior level across North America.

 

Our Belief

 

We believe in the passion and energy of those involved with our philosophy that hard work, dedication and individual growth leads to a positive future for all who are associated with our member leagues.

 

What We Stand For

 

The CJHL is a nation-wide advocate for excellence in Canadian Junior Hockey.

 

The CJHL supports the positive values that hockey provides to our players as they develop into adults.

 

The CJHL seeks to be an integral partner in the career development of all of its players.

 

Our Goals

 

To provide athletes with unique experiences and more options for sound futures.

 

To develop athletic and academic discipline in a high performance setting.

 

To communicate with the commitment to promote trust and integrity.

 

 

Your FUTURE is here!